Archive for the ‘Molybdenum’ Category

Molybdenum

Thursday, July 21st, 2011

While you’re probably familiar with iron, calcium, zinc, and many of other minerals your body needs to function at peak levels, most people have never have heard of molybdenum. In fact, you might think you had caught some infectious disease if your doctor started talking about levels of this trace mineral. Molybdenum is an important mineral involved with everyday functions of the body.

Molybdenum ChartWhy is Molybdenum Important?
This little-known element helps every part of the body, from your brain to your liver, function properly. Molybdenum is essential for the proper metabolization of RNA and DNA, the acids that make up a large part of every cell in our body. This process converts food into energy, regulates blood sugar, and carries away the toxic bi-products. By helping our cells function properly and riding our body’s of toxins, Molybdenum prevents the development of cancer cells.

As a cleansing agent, molybdenum is particularly good at removing sulfite toxins from the human body. Because sulfites are commonly used in preservatives, most people are constantly adding them to their system through food and drugs. Without molybdenum, increased sulfite levels could cause symptoms similar to an allergic reaction.

Molybdenum also helps detoxify the liver, produce essential enzymes, and even prevents tooth decay. It is also critical to proper brain and kidney function. Low levels caused by genetic malformations, which prevent proper absorption, can lead to anything from neurological problems to mental retardation.  Impotence in older men can even be caused by abnormally low levels of this mineral.

How Much Do I Need?
Now that you know how important it is to get a sufficient amount of molybdenum, you’re probably wondering about your own body. Luckily, there’s no need to panic. Unless you have a genetic problem, you’re almost guaranteed to get enough of this trace mineral from your diet. Because molybdenum deficiency is so rare, an official recommended daily allowance (RDA) has not even been established. Opinions on the subject vary, but most experts agree that the 25 micrograms found in most supplements is enough to prevent problems.

Only a tiny amount of Molybdenum is needed for proper cell function and since it is a mineral you do not want to intake higher levels than necessary.  Too much can make your body lose copper, another important mineral, or cause gout, anemia, or diarrhea.

MolybdenumNatural Sources of Molybdenum
Lucky for us, molybdenum can be found in a wide variety of food sources. If you live in an area with hard tap-water, especially well water, this mineral-rich fluid probably contains molybdenum in addition to other important elements. While the highest levels of molybdenum can be found in legumes, leafy green vegetables, and whole grains, the type of food isn’t actually the biggest indicator of mineral levels. Because plants absorb this mineral from the soil, any plant product grown in molybdenum-rich areas will contain more than those cultivated in mineral-poor soil. This mineral can sometimes be found in animal liver and low-fat milk, as well.

Symptoms of Molybdenum Deficiency
There’s rarely a reason to worry about low levels of this mineral. Most of the time, symptoms can be attributed to other problems and aren’t a result of too little molybdenum. However, this is a list of possible symptoms just in case you need a little reassurance:

  • Mood swings and irritability
  • Fatigue
  • Impotence
  • Tooth Decay
  • Anemia
  • Poor General Health

 

Share