Archive for the ‘Vitamins’ Category

Primrose Oil: Super-Nutrient a Vegetarian Alternative to Fish Oil

Friday, January 6th, 2012

If you don’t like the idea of ingesting any type of animal product, even in supplement form, primrose oil can provide the same benefits as fish oil while allowing you to maintain a vegetarian lifestyle. Extracted from the evening primrose, a plant that displays yellow blooms in the evening hours, this oil contains a high percentage of GLA, gamma-linolenic acid, also known as Omega 6 fatty acid.

Don’t I Need Omega 3s?
Your body does need the Omega 3 fatty acids contained in fish oil, but it’s also capable of converting plant-based Omega 6 compounds into Omega 3s. This provides the same health benefits as consuming them directly through either fish or fish oil supplements.

Primrose Oil and FlowerWhat are the Health Benefits of Primrose Oil?
The GLA in evening primrose oil is reported to support brain function, body growth and overall development. It also promotes hair and skin growth, healthy bones, an efficient metabolism and reproductive health. This vegetarian-friendly supplement has also been shown to help treat or manage a number of diseases including:

  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Ulcerative Colitis
  • Sjogren’s Syndrome
  • Osteoporosis
  • Hypertension

The Future of Primrose Oil
Because of primrose oil’s other benefits, researchers have been looking for new ways to use this vegetarian supplement. So far, it has been found to help with some cancers, especially cerebral gliomas. Primrose oil has shown some promise with skin disorders like atopic dermatitis, mastalgia and some uremic skin disorders.

Sticking with a vegetarian diet doesn’t mean you should ignore the nutrients traditionally provided by animal products.Instead, seek out plant-based alternatives that offer the same health benefits. The omega nutrients are a vital component to your overall health and should not be disregarded just because the most common form comes from animals. Primrose oil is the perfect alternative to the fish oil supplements.

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Molybdenum

Thursday, July 21st, 2011

While you’re probably familiar with iron, calcium, zinc, and many of other minerals your body needs to function at peak levels, most people have never have heard of molybdenum. In fact, you might think you had caught some infectious disease if your doctor started talking about levels of this trace mineral. Molybdenum is an important mineral involved with everyday functions of the body.

Molybdenum ChartWhy is Molybdenum Important?
This little-known element helps every part of the body, from your brain to your liver, function properly. Molybdenum is essential for the proper metabolization of RNA and DNA, the acids that make up a large part of every cell in our body. This process converts food into energy, regulates blood sugar, and carries away the toxic bi-products. By helping our cells function properly and riding our body’s of toxins, Molybdenum prevents the development of cancer cells.

As a cleansing agent, molybdenum is particularly good at removing sulfite toxins from the human body. Because sulfites are commonly used in preservatives, most people are constantly adding them to their system through food and drugs. Without molybdenum, increased sulfite levels could cause symptoms similar to an allergic reaction.

Molybdenum also helps detoxify the liver, produce essential enzymes, and even prevents tooth decay. It is also critical to proper brain and kidney function. Low levels caused by genetic malformations, which prevent proper absorption, can lead to anything from neurological problems to mental retardation.  Impotence in older men can even be caused by abnormally low levels of this mineral.

How Much Do I Need?
Now that you know how important it is to get a sufficient amount of molybdenum, you’re probably wondering about your own body. Luckily, there’s no need to panic. Unless you have a genetic problem, you’re almost guaranteed to get enough of this trace mineral from your diet. Because molybdenum deficiency is so rare, an official recommended daily allowance (RDA) has not even been established. Opinions on the subject vary, but most experts agree that the 25 micrograms found in most supplements is enough to prevent problems.

Only a tiny amount of Molybdenum is needed for proper cell function and since it is a mineral you do not want to intake higher levels than necessary.  Too much can make your body lose copper, another important mineral, or cause gout, anemia, or diarrhea.

MolybdenumNatural Sources of Molybdenum
Lucky for us, molybdenum can be found in a wide variety of food sources. If you live in an area with hard tap-water, especially well water, this mineral-rich fluid probably contains molybdenum in addition to other important elements. While the highest levels of molybdenum can be found in legumes, leafy green vegetables, and whole grains, the type of food isn’t actually the biggest indicator of mineral levels. Because plants absorb this mineral from the soil, any plant product grown in molybdenum-rich areas will contain more than those cultivated in mineral-poor soil. This mineral can sometimes be found in animal liver and low-fat milk, as well.

Symptoms of Molybdenum Deficiency
There’s rarely a reason to worry about low levels of this mineral. Most of the time, symptoms can be attributed to other problems and aren’t a result of too little molybdenum. However, this is a list of possible symptoms just in case you need a little reassurance:

  • Mood swings and irritability
  • Fatigue
  • Impotence
  • Tooth Decay
  • Anemia
  • Poor General Health

 

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Summer: The Time to Take Exercise Outside

Thursday, July 21st, 2011

T-shirt and shorts weather makes for perfect conditions to take your exercise routine outside. Whether you’re gardening, running through your neighborhood, tossing a Frisbee in the park or playing volleyball in the sand, summer exercise can increase your cardiovascular health, bone strength and mood levels, as well as be a fun part of your day.

Warmer weather allows us to change many of our car-related activities to bike errands or walking sojourns. Take advantage of your nearby grocery store or farmers market by walking or biking. You will be less inclined to purchase unnecessary junk foods and more apt to select healthier, natural foods. The benefits of walking or biking not only extend to your body, but also to your mind. You have a chance to appreciate your surroundings in a way that you seldom would see from the windshield, and exercise has been proven to be one of the most beneficial preventative measures for mental health issues like depression, anxiety and even Alzheimer’s.

Try taking a yoga or weight-routine outside.  These stress reducing activities help to keep your blood pressure normal and prevent heart disease.  Also, the natural effect of sunshine can boost your mood through Vitamin D synthesis, which helps to increase levels of serotonin in the brain. Numerous studies have shown people suffering from depression, especially those living at latitudes of 35 and higher, tend to notice improvements in mood as their levels of Vitamin D naturally increase during the summer months.  The recommended daily intake of Vitamin D is 400 IU for adults and 600 IU for those age 71 and up.  Erica T. Goode, MD, MPH, a physician at the California Pacific Medical Center’s Health & Healing Center-Clinic in San Francisco, says that everyone should try to get at least 1,000 IU per day through a combination of diet, sun and supplementation.

In addition to increased mood levels, the vitamin D you get from the summer sun also helps to improve the strength of your bones.  A 2010 Surgeon General report shows that lack of exercise and deficiencies in both calcium and Vitamin D, especially in women, has subjected as many as 48 million Americans to osteoporosis.  Adding a few weight exercises can  improve bone health by slowing down the replacement of bone marrow by fat inside the bones.  In as little as 15 minutes a day, you can  increase your bone strength by trying these resistant band exercises at your local park or in your back yard.

Here are a few simple exercises you can take outdoors:

  • Squat Press: Using a resistance band, stand with your feet on the middle of the band a little further than hip distance apart.  With the handles in your hands at shoulder height, palms up, slowly squat down like you are sitting in a chair.  Once your knees are at 90 degrees slowly stand up and press the handles up over your head in one fluid motion.  Lower back down to the squat without pausing and repeat 10-15 times.
  • Rows: Wrap the resistance band around a pole at about shoulder height.  Step back from the pole until you feel some resistance on the band with arms fully extended in front of your body.  Pull the handles towards your body, palms facing in, keeping your elbows in towards your rib cage and always keeping resistance on the band. repeat 10-15 times with slow, smooth movements.
  • Chest Press: Keeping the resistance band and distance from the pole in the same place as the previous exercise, turn around and face away.  Start with your arms bent, elbows facing out, at shoulder height.  Push the handles straight out from your chest.  Always keeping resistance on the band,repeat 10-15 times with slow, smooth movements.
  • Calf Rises (no band needed):  Standing on the edge of a curb or step with one foot, lower the dangling foot to the ground. Straighten the supporting leg and come all the way up onto your toes before lowering the opposite foot again.  Repeat 10-15 times per leg in slow motion.

One important aspect of the above exercises is quality not speed.  Remember the longer you hold the resistance the more effective the exercise will be.  Don’t have a resistance band?  Use your natural body weight by flexing the target muscles.

Try to schedule your summer activities during the time when the sun is low in the sky. This is important, as exercising during peak sun hours, usually between about 10 a.m. and 3 p.m., can cause heat exhaustion, increase dehydration and even result in sun stroke.   Always be sure to drink plenty of water  and as an added treat, take some unsalted nuts as a high-protein, post workout snack..

However you choose to spend time outside during the warm summer months, be sure to have fun, stay hydrated and always look for new ways to naturally improve your life.

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