Posts Tagged ‘passion fruit’

Cupuacu | An Exotic Super Fruit!

Monday, December 5th, 2011

Cupuaçu, also spelled Cupuassu, Cupuazú, and Copoasu is definitely not the prettiest fruit, but its health benefits are more than attractive! Just in case pronouncing this strange-looking name has you a little worried, here’s a phonetic representation to help you out: “coo-poo-wa-soo.”

This superfruit grows naturally in the lush Amazon basin as well as in the jungles of Peru, Bolivia, Brazil and Columbia. As a member of the Cacao family, Cupuacu is tasty, too! With a unique flavor that includes hints of banana, passion fruit and chocolate, you would enjoy adding this one to your diet even if it wasn’t good for you.

Cupuaçu Healthy Properties
Cupuacu gets its power from a healthy dose of phytochemicals and flavenoids, the same chemicals that are thought to make green tea, red wine, green leafy vegetables and so many other plant-based food items extremely healthy for humans. Here’s a breakdown of the specific chemicals that give Cupuacu its superfruit status:

  • CapuacuPolyphenolic Tannis – Found in red wine and grape juice, tannins have strong anti-inflammatory properties. Studies have shown they also have antiviral, antiparasitic and antibacterial effects.
  • Thegrandins – A unique polyphenol, this substance acts as a super antioxidant. Cupuacu is one of the only known sources of this healthy ingredient.
  • Catechins – This antioxidant is responsible for dark chocolate’s healthy properties. In animal studies, it’s been shown to protect the brain from experiencing a stroke when included as a regular part of the diet.
  • Quercetin – A beneficial flavenoid, quercetin has strong antiviral, anti-inflammatory and cancer-fighting properties.
  • Kaempferol – This flavenoid, also found in green tea and broccoli, protects the body from cardiovascular disease and cancer.
  • Isoscutellarein – A powerful flavenoid that promotes a healthy heart.

Additional Health Benefits of Cupuaçu
The health benefits don’t stop at the end of that impressive list! Natives use this fruit to ease the pain of childbirth and to increase stamina and energy levels. Although it does act as a mild, uplifting stimulant, Cupuacu has much lower levels of caffeine and theobromine than its cousin, the cacao seed. It is also high in vitamin C, and the seeds are often made into a rich moisturizer similar to cocoa butter.

When shopping for the raw fruit, look for an oblong, fuzzy, brown fruit that’s about eight-inches long with a hard shell. Once opened, the white pulp will smell of pineapple and chocolate. Cupuacu is also available in supplemental form including capsules and juice drinks. While the capsules will have little of the delicious Cupuacu flavor, the juice tastes mostly like pear with just a touch of banana.

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